transforms

Technology, Physical, Art
sojamo tumble / Generative, Computational, Visuals
sojamo / Andreas Schlegel


transforms
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Scientists Create Transparent Solar Concentrator, via IFLScience
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“Rumplestiltskin” Bacteria Digests Toxic Liquid, Poops 24-Karat Gold, "Rumplestiltskin" Bacteria Digests Toxic Liquid, Poops 24-Karat Gold | Ecouterre. “Scientists at Michigan State University have discovered a strain of bacteria that literally excretes gold. Cupriavidus metalliduran, according to microbiologist Kazem Kashefi and electronic artist Adam Brown, doesn’t just survive on toxic concentrations of auric chloride, it thrives.”
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Kira Van, via spiegel.de
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The prototypes[7] of the x-y mutual capacitance multi-touch screens (left) developed at CERN. via wikipedia
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growing air, “Trees and plants absorb harmful pollutants by sucking them up through a network of tiny pores on the surface of their leaves. This system also siphons particulate matter — the tiny particles of liquid, metal, soil and dust that can pass through the throat into the lungs, along with the byproducts of fuel and many of the toxic chemicals used in building materials.” dont miss the 5 mins how to video
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A second massive crater has appeared in a remote part of Siberia on the Yamal Peninsula, called “the end of the world.” The new crater was discovered by reindeer herders about 30 kilometers (19 miles) from the first, reports the Moscow Times.
More news: “In findings that have seriously alarmed environmental scientists, two more chasms have recently been discovered, leading experts to believe they’re part of an alarming trend that can be linked to global warming. The explanation: Siberian permafrost contains a deep, frozen mixture of salt, sand, gas and water that has laid largely undisturbed for around 11,000 years. As the Siberian peninsula warms, the permafrost is beginning to thaw. As the gas mixes with salt and water (as well as salty sand), the result is a volatile mixture that builds pressure until it ejects out of the ground with massive force. The Siberian Times reports this is the generally accepted theory. [..] Why you should care: Melting permafrost releases large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas 20 times as potent as carbon dioxide.
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Lego Microscope This build was originally inspired by the Lego X-Pod sets. While trying to find a use for the pod itself, I realized that it was very close to a deep petri dish. I used a planetary gear system to allow both coarse and fine adjustment of the objective “lens”. A little more tinkering and I connected the focus to a magnifying glass and fiber optic light in the eyepiece, so adjusting the focus knobs would actually bring the writing on a Lego stud in and out of focus. via Geeky Gadgets, legosaurus, jtotheizzoe
Lego Microscope This build was originally inspired by the Lego X-Pod sets. While trying to find a use for the pod itself, I realized that it was very close to a deep petri dish. I used a planetary gear system to allow both coarse and fine adjustment of the objective “lens”. A little more tinkering and I connected the focus to a magnifying glass and fiber optic light in the eyepiece, so adjusting the focus knobs would actually bring the writing on a Lego stud in and out of focus. via Geeky Gadgets, legosaurus, jtotheizzoe
Lego Microscope This build was originally inspired by the Lego X-Pod sets. While trying to find a use for the pod itself, I realized that it was very close to a deep petri dish. I used a planetary gear system to allow both coarse and fine adjustment of the objective “lens”. A little more tinkering and I connected the focus to a magnifying glass and fiber optic light in the eyepiece, so adjusting the focus knobs would actually bring the writing on a Lego stud in and out of focus. via Geeky Gadgets, legosaurus, jtotheizzoe
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DESIGN: The Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs The Zuta Labs’ pocket printer has apparently made mobile printing a dream come true. Read More via wetheurban
DESIGN: The Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs The Zuta Labs’ pocket printer has apparently made mobile printing a dream come true. Read More via wetheurban
DESIGN: The Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs The Zuta Labs’ pocket printer has apparently made mobile printing a dream come true. Read More via wetheurban
DESIGN: The Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs The Zuta Labs’ pocket printer has apparently made mobile printing a dream come true. Read More via wetheurban
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Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri via itscolossal
Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri via itscolossal
Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri via itscolossal
Geometric Beehive Sculptures by Ren Ri via itscolossal
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19 Year Old Develops Machine To Clean The Oceans Of Plastic. “Plastic might be a cheap, versatile and useful material, but it’s also an environmental disaster. We produce around 300 million tons of plastic per year, and since 1950 we have produced around 6 billion metric tons of the stuff. It’s clogging up landfills, becoming trapped in Arctic ice, polluting our oceans and harming wildlife. Recently, we heard the results of a survey of the seafloor off the European coast which revealed garbage as deep as 4.5 kilometers below the surface.” via iflscience
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World’s First Analog 3D Printer, requires no computers, software or electricity, by Daniel de Bruin. While all of the 3D printers that we know of today utilize an elaborate computerized and electrical system in order to operate, Bruin wanted to create a machine that was completely manual.
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"Yesterday, there was a wall of Tesla patents in the lobby of our Palo Alto headquarters. That is no longer the case. They have been removed, in the spirit of the open source movement, for the advancement of electric vehicle technology."
via All Our Patent Are Belong To You, Tesla Motors
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Amor Muñoz
via The Creators Project: Sewable Circuit Boards Create Jobs In Mexico
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A very innovative idea to turn salt water into potable water.
futurist-foresight: disrupteneurs:
The Disrupteneur of the day award goes to Gabriele Diamanti. This is beautiful story 
business-and-technology:
GABRIELE DIAMANTI HOPES TO SEE LOCAL CRAFTSMEN ALL OVER THE WORLD ADAPT HIS DESIGN.
“Projects ‘for the 90%’ mostly fall somewhere between two extremes: charity and business,” designer Gabriele Diamanti tells Co.Design. “Neither was my inspiration!” Instead, spurred on by his own extensive travel and friends’ involvement in NGOs, he developed a fascination with global water scarcity as a graduate student at Milan Polytechnic in 2005; he recently decided to pursue his interest again and the result is Eliodomestico, an open-source variation on a solar still.
It functions by filling the black boiler with salty sea water in the morning, then tightening the cap. As the temperature and pressure grows, steam is forced downwards through a connection pipe and collects in the lid, which acts as a condenser, turning the steam into fresh water. Once Diamanti established the fundamentals were sound, he experimented with a series of concepts for the aesthetic of the object. “My goal was to design something friendly and recognizable for the users,” he explains. “The process developed quite naturally to determine the current shape; every detail is there for a reason, so the form, as well as production techniques, represent a compromise between technical and traditional.” Primary field studies in sub-Saharan Africa revealed the habit of carrying goods on the head—also a common practice in other areas around the world—and this was integrated into Eliodomestico’s plan. And while solar stills aren’t a totally new concept, Diamanti says it’s rare to find them in a domestic context rather than in missions or hospitals, or as large plants overseen by qualified personnel that serve entire communities. “I tried to make something for a real household that could be operated directly by the families,” he says.
The project recently won a Core77 Design Award for Social Impact; already, Diamanti has received international feedback, and hopes to see locals adapt and modify the design to take advantage of their own readily available materials and native environments. “The idea is that instructions for the project can be delivered to craftsmen” with the help of NGOs, he says, then a micro-credit program could be established to finance small-scale start-ups specializing in production. “So the NGO is the spark, micro-credit is the fuse, the local craftsmen are the bomb!”
A very innovative idea to turn salt water into potable water.
futurist-foresight: disrupteneurs:
The Disrupteneur of the day award goes to Gabriele Diamanti. This is beautiful story 
business-and-technology:
GABRIELE DIAMANTI HOPES TO SEE LOCAL CRAFTSMEN ALL OVER THE WORLD ADAPT HIS DESIGN.
“Projects ‘for the 90%’ mostly fall somewhere between two extremes: charity and business,” designer Gabriele Diamanti tells Co.Design. “Neither was my inspiration!” Instead, spurred on by his own extensive travel and friends’ involvement in NGOs, he developed a fascination with global water scarcity as a graduate student at Milan Polytechnic in 2005; he recently decided to pursue his interest again and the result is Eliodomestico, an open-source variation on a solar still.
It functions by filling the black boiler with salty sea water in the morning, then tightening the cap. As the temperature and pressure grows, steam is forced downwards through a connection pipe and collects in the lid, which acts as a condenser, turning the steam into fresh water. Once Diamanti established the fundamentals were sound, he experimented with a series of concepts for the aesthetic of the object. “My goal was to design something friendly and recognizable for the users,” he explains. “The process developed quite naturally to determine the current shape; every detail is there for a reason, so the form, as well as production techniques, represent a compromise between technical and traditional.” Primary field studies in sub-Saharan Africa revealed the habit of carrying goods on the head—also a common practice in other areas around the world—and this was integrated into Eliodomestico’s plan. And while solar stills aren’t a totally new concept, Diamanti says it’s rare to find them in a domestic context rather than in missions or hospitals, or as large plants overseen by qualified personnel that serve entire communities. “I tried to make something for a real household that could be operated directly by the families,” he says.
The project recently won a Core77 Design Award for Social Impact; already, Diamanti has received international feedback, and hopes to see locals adapt and modify the design to take advantage of their own readily available materials and native environments. “The idea is that instructions for the project can be delivered to craftsmen” with the help of NGOs, he says, then a micro-credit program could be established to finance small-scale start-ups specializing in production. “So the NGO is the spark, micro-credit is the fuse, the local craftsmen are the bomb!”
A very innovative idea to turn salt water into potable water.
futurist-foresight: disrupteneurs:
The Disrupteneur of the day award goes to Gabriele Diamanti. This is beautiful story 
business-and-technology:
GABRIELE DIAMANTI HOPES TO SEE LOCAL CRAFTSMEN ALL OVER THE WORLD ADAPT HIS DESIGN.
“Projects ‘for the 90%’ mostly fall somewhere between two extremes: charity and business,” designer Gabriele Diamanti tells Co.Design. “Neither was my inspiration!” Instead, spurred on by his own extensive travel and friends’ involvement in NGOs, he developed a fascination with global water scarcity as a graduate student at Milan Polytechnic in 2005; he recently decided to pursue his interest again and the result is Eliodomestico, an open-source variation on a solar still.
It functions by filling the black boiler with salty sea water in the morning, then tightening the cap. As the temperature and pressure grows, steam is forced downwards through a connection pipe and collects in the lid, which acts as a condenser, turning the steam into fresh water. Once Diamanti established the fundamentals were sound, he experimented with a series of concepts for the aesthetic of the object. “My goal was to design something friendly and recognizable for the users,” he explains. “The process developed quite naturally to determine the current shape; every detail is there for a reason, so the form, as well as production techniques, represent a compromise between technical and traditional.” Primary field studies in sub-Saharan Africa revealed the habit of carrying goods on the head—also a common practice in other areas around the world—and this was integrated into Eliodomestico’s plan. And while solar stills aren’t a totally new concept, Diamanti says it’s rare to find them in a domestic context rather than in missions or hospitals, or as large plants overseen by qualified personnel that serve entire communities. “I tried to make something for a real household that could be operated directly by the families,” he says.
The project recently won a Core77 Design Award for Social Impact; already, Diamanti has received international feedback, and hopes to see locals adapt and modify the design to take advantage of their own readily available materials and native environments. “The idea is that instructions for the project can be delivered to craftsmen” with the help of NGOs, he says, then a micro-credit program could be established to finance small-scale start-ups specializing in production. “So the NGO is the spark, micro-credit is the fuse, the local craftsmen are the bomb!”
A very innovative idea to turn salt water into potable water.
futurist-foresight: disrupteneurs:
The Disrupteneur of the day award goes to Gabriele Diamanti. This is beautiful story 
business-and-technology:
GABRIELE DIAMANTI HOPES TO SEE LOCAL CRAFTSMEN ALL OVER THE WORLD ADAPT HIS DESIGN.
“Projects ‘for the 90%’ mostly fall somewhere between two extremes: charity and business,” designer Gabriele Diamanti tells Co.Design. “Neither was my inspiration!” Instead, spurred on by his own extensive travel and friends’ involvement in NGOs, he developed a fascination with global water scarcity as a graduate student at Milan Polytechnic in 2005; he recently decided to pursue his interest again and the result is Eliodomestico, an open-source variation on a solar still.
It functions by filling the black boiler with salty sea water in the morning, then tightening the cap. As the temperature and pressure grows, steam is forced downwards through a connection pipe and collects in the lid, which acts as a condenser, turning the steam into fresh water. Once Diamanti established the fundamentals were sound, he experimented with a series of concepts for the aesthetic of the object. “My goal was to design something friendly and recognizable for the users,” he explains. “The process developed quite naturally to determine the current shape; every detail is there for a reason, so the form, as well as production techniques, represent a compromise between technical and traditional.” Primary field studies in sub-Saharan Africa revealed the habit of carrying goods on the head—also a common practice in other areas around the world—and this was integrated into Eliodomestico’s plan. And while solar stills aren’t a totally new concept, Diamanti says it’s rare to find them in a domestic context rather than in missions or hospitals, or as large plants overseen by qualified personnel that serve entire communities. “I tried to make something for a real household that could be operated directly by the families,” he says.
The project recently won a Core77 Design Award for Social Impact; already, Diamanti has received international feedback, and hopes to see locals adapt and modify the design to take advantage of their own readily available materials and native environments. “The idea is that instructions for the project can be delivered to craftsmen” with the help of NGOs, he says, then a micro-credit program could be established to finance small-scale start-ups specializing in production. “So the NGO is the spark, micro-credit is the fuse, the local craftsmen are the bomb!”
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Jorge Luis Borges: The Task of Art The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something which can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the sometimes joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. Your are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must be transformed, and eventually will be transformed. This revelation can appear anytime. A poet never rests. He’s always working, even when he dreams. Besides, the life of a writer, is a lonely one. You think you are alone, and as the years go by, if the stars are on your side, you may discover that you are at the center of a vast circle of invisible friends whom you will never get to know but who love you. And that is an immense reward. Thx @robinsloan
via austinkleon, notational
Jorge Luis Borges: The Task of Art The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something which can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the sometimes joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. Your are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must be transformed, and eventually will be transformed. This revelation can appear anytime. A poet never rests. He’s always working, even when he dreams. Besides, the life of a writer, is a lonely one. You think you are alone, and as the years go by, if the stars are on your side, you may discover that you are at the center of a vast circle of invisible friends whom you will never get to know but who love you. And that is an immense reward. Thx @robinsloan
via austinkleon, notational
Jorge Luis Borges: The Task of Art The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something which can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the sometimes joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. Your are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must be transformed, and eventually will be transformed. This revelation can appear anytime. A poet never rests. He’s always working, even when he dreams. Besides, the life of a writer, is a lonely one. You think you are alone, and as the years go by, if the stars are on your side, you may discover that you are at the center of a vast circle of invisible friends whom you will never get to know but who love you. And that is an immense reward. Thx @robinsloan
via austinkleon, notational
Jorge Luis Borges: The Task of Art The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something which can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the sometimes joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. Your are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must be transformed, and eventually will be transformed. This revelation can appear anytime. A poet never rests. He’s always working, even when he dreams. Besides, the life of a writer, is a lonely one. You think you are alone, and as the years go by, if the stars are on your side, you may discover that you are at the center of a vast circle of invisible friends whom you will never get to know but who love you. And that is an immense reward. Thx @robinsloan
via austinkleon, notational
Jorge Luis Borges: The Task of Art The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something which can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the sometimes joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. Your are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must be transformed, and eventually will be transformed. This revelation can appear anytime. A poet never rests. He’s always working, even when he dreams. Besides, the life of a writer, is a lonely one. You think you are alone, and as the years go by, if the stars are on your side, you may discover that you are at the center of a vast circle of invisible friends whom you will never get to know but who love you. And that is an immense reward. Thx @robinsloan
via austinkleon, notational